Thursday, May 08, 2008

Yung Kee, world's best Roast Goose @ Hong Kong

YES! I made it to this HK institution ...
Add: 32-40 Wellington Street, Central, Hong Kong
Tel: +852 2522 1624
Nice upmarket feel inside (I was initially sceptical how all this was funded by ... uh ... roast goose ... but after savouring it, I understood how!)

Val on FEAR FACTOR ... first ever Century Egg aka Pei Tan!


The signature ... the legendary ... Roast Goose. HKD$210 for half a goose, plenty to share, and the most splendid and delicious (addictive!) gravy.


Glutinous rice in Lotus leaf


Slurp!

The aftermath!

The damage! Only HKD$433 for the three of us. Good value , surprisingly!

History of Yung Kee from yungkee.com
More than half a century ago, it was a modest cooked food stall in Kwong Yuen West Street. Its founder, Mr. Kam Shui Fai was renowned for his Roast Goose. So even tourists and crewmen flocked in groups to savour the specialty from Hong Kong-Macau Ferry Terminal.
Yung Kee acquires fame for its gourmet specialty-Roast Goose. It becomes well known among people in Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macau, and it also attracts many tourists from foreign countries. After tasting the Roast Goose, they buy and carry it home with them by air to share among relatives and friends. For that, Yung Kee's Roast Goose is nicknamed "Flying Roast Goose". Yung Kee's founder, Mr. Kam Shui Fai, is also called "Roast Goose Fai".
From a young and penniless restaurant apprentice to become the owner of Yung Kee Restaurant and Yung Kee Building, which is situated in prime Central commercial area, Mr. Kam Shui Fai, the self-made man, has been acclaimed as a legendary figure for his success by foreign and local press. In 1968, Yung Kee has been named by the Fortune Magazine to be one of the Top Fifteen Restaurants in the World, the only Chinese restaurant on the list.
From a young man without means, Mr. Kam Shui Fai has struggled hard in his life. In 1942, he used his savings of HK$4,000 to rent a commercial unit at 32 Wing Lok Street, and officially started the first stage of the history of "Yung Kee Restaurant". During that period, it experienced the occupation of Hong Kong by the Japanese and the Wing Lok Street Building was destroyed by Japanese air-raids. In 1944, the Restaurant was moved to, again the same street number, 32 Pottinger Street, to accommodate increase in business.
In 1964, Mr. Kam Shui Fai formally purchased 32 Wellington Street, coincidentally also number 32! Eventually four more adjacent buildings were acquired. In 1978, the five commercial units were torn down and rebuilt to become the site of the present day "Yung Kee Building". The restaurant was furnished to modern standards and the management and operations were streamlined. However, the traditional good services have been maintained to serve customers.

Walking out ...

5 comments:

mimi said...

Was the skin crispy? It doesn't look like...

kaisershozhay@gmail.com said...

It never ceases to amaze me how ppl continue to rave abt Yung Kee's famous roast goose. The only thing it is famous for is how over-rated and over-priced it is. Half a goose for HK$210! U can easily get one (same quality) in other restaurants in HK for 1/3 the price.
I just got some for HK$90 for half a goose today, for my cousin who was flying back to KL. :P

264clarinet said...

I just wrote a review in my blog. The skin isn't crispy. Their roast goose is really good but over-priced. I like their "century egg with pickled ginger" as well.

Foodycat said...

OK, you have convinced me! I am going to Hong Kong for the first time at the end of the week and I AM going to Yung Kee for goose! I am a bit scared of the century eggs though.

Julian Si said...

Taken in moderation ... century eggs are quite interesting :-)